Why Does Procedure Matter? Back in the fall of 1987, when I was in my…

The blog with a link to our resource page seems to have disappeared.  You can…

What Happens to Work Permit Holders Who Have Lost Jobs Due to COVID-19? Foreign nationals…

New Window of Opportunity for Challenging Immigration Decisions March 23, 2020 By Hans John Kalina…

Respecting and Maintaining Professionalism as a Lawyer True, we build no bridges. We raise no…

Legal Fees Explained By Hans John Kalina Let’s talk about legal fees. The topic of…

Anatomy of a Criminal Proceeding by Hans John Kalina What exactly does a lawyer do…

As a lawyer practicing both criminal and immigration law, I often receive requests from colleagues for professional advice on issues they are facing when the two branches of law intersect. Recently, I was consulted by a client on behalf of a fellow criminal defence lawyer to provide an opinion letter for a judicial pretrial on the effect of a discharge for a domestic assault an accused was facing.  The client was accused of assaulting his wife.  He, and his wife, were also facing potential deportation. Fortunately, we were able to resolve their predicament.

With the Supreme Court decision in Tran v. Canada, non-citizens (permanent or temporary residents of Canada) will no longer be subject to inadmissibility proceedings and possible deportation as a result of being sentenced for to a conditional sentence of imprisonment.

The Law of Bail in Canada Revisited June 2, 2017 Being arrested by the police…

What to do When Stopped by the Police Being stopped by the police, whether at…